What happens if a baby has tongue tie?

Do babies grow out of tongue-tie?

If tongue-tie is left alone, babies can often grow out of it as their mouth develops. However, some cases of tongue-tie may require surgery for correction.

Can a baby being tongue tied affect speech?

Tongue-tie will not affect a child’s ability to learn speech and will not cause speech delay, but it may cause issues with articulation, or the way the words are pronounced.

What happens if you don’t fix tongue-tie?

Some of the problems that can occur when tongue tie is left untreated include the following: Oral health problems: These can occur in older children who still have tongue tie. This condition makes it harder to keep teeth clean, which increases the risk of tooth decay and gum problems.

At what age can tongue-tie be treated?

Tongue-tie can improve on its own by the age of two or three years. Severe cases of tongue-tie can be treated by cutting the tissue under the tongue (the frenum). This is called a frenectomy.

Are Tongue ties genetic?

Anyone can develop tongue-tie. In some cases, tongue-tie is hereditary (runs in the family). The condition occurs up to 10 percent of children (depending on the study and definition of tongue-tie). Tongue-tie mostly affects infants and younger children, but older children and adults may also live with the condition.

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Should I fix my baby’s tongue-tie?

Medical experts don’t routinely ‘snip’ a tongue-tie, but the procedure is often recommended to improve breastfeeding.

What sounds are affected by tongue-tie?

Tongue-tie can interfere with the ability to make certain sounds — such as “t,” “d,” “z,” “s,” “th,” “r” and “l.” Poor oral hygiene. For an older child or adult, tongue-tie can make it difficult to sweep food debris from the teeth.

How common is tongue tied baby?

Tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is a condition in which the thin piece of skin under the baby’s tongue (the lingual frenulum) is abnormally short and may restrict the movement of the tongue. Tongue-tie occurs in about three per cent of babies and is a condition that can run in families.